IJSTR

International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

IJSTR@Facebook IJSTR@Twitter IJSTR@Linkedin
Home About Us Scope Editorial Board Blog/Latest News Contact Us
CALL FOR PAPERS
AUTHORS
DOWNLOADS
CONTACT
QR CODE
IJSTR-QR Code

IJSTR >> Volume 4 - Issue 2, February 2015 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Evaluating Changes In Fertility Status Of An Alfisol Under Different Growth Stages Of Cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz)

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

B. Osundare

 

KEYWORDS

Key words: Alfisol, cassava, evaluating, fertility, growth, status

 

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Evaluating changes in soil nutrient status under different growth stages of cassava, makes possible determination of the most critical stage in its vegetative growth phase, when its demand for nutrients is highest. Determining the most critical stage in cassava vegetative growth phase, when its nutrient demand is highest, will enhance properly timed fertilizer application in such a way the application will coincide with the most critical stage in cassava vegetative phase when its demand for nutrients is highest. In view of this, a two year field experiment was designed to assess changes in nutrient status of an Alfisol under different growth stages of cassava during 2010 and 2011 cropping seasons at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. The different growth stages of cassava when changes in nutrient status of Alfisol were evaluated included: 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after planting (MAP). The results indicated existence of significant (P = 0.05) differences among the different growth stages of cassava as regards their effects on chemical properties of Alfisol. During 2010 cropping season, the significant decreases in soil organic carbon (SOC) under growth stages of cassava were from 0.96 g kg-1 for ISNSPTC to 0.88, 0.80, 0.72 and0.64 g kg-1 for ages 3, 6, 9 and 12 MAP, respectively. Similarly, during 2011 cropping season, the significant decreases in soil organic carbon (SOC) under growth stages of cassava were from 0.96 g kg-1 for ISNSPTC to 0.80, 0.73, 0.66 and0.58 g kg-1 for ages 3, 6, 9 and 12 MAP, respectively. During 2010 cropping season, the significant decreases in total N under growth stages of cassava were from 0.68 g kg-1 for ISNSPTC to 0.57, 0.50, 0.43 and0.35 g kg-1 for ages 3, 6, 9 and 12 MAP, respectively. During 2011 cropping season, the significant decreases in total N under growth stages of cassava were from 0.68 g kg-1 for ISNSPTC to 0.54, 0.47, 0.41 and0.32 g kg-1 for ages 3, 6, 9 and 12 MAP, respectively.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Aesop, J. 2004. Study on mineral requirements of cassava. Plant Nutrition Research. 17:222 228.

[2] Aina, B. O. 2010. Performance of cassava under different inorganic fertilizer application regimes. Crop Sciencde Research. 22(2):6 12.

[3] Akinyemi, E. 2011. Effects of tillage practices and fertilizer application on the performance of cassava. Journal of Food and Agricultural Research. 15:45 51.

[4] Anda, A. A. 2009. Growth and yield of cassava as affected by time of NPK fertilizer application and frequency of weeding. Journal of Applied Sciences. 32(2):234 239.

[5] Angers, D. A., N.Samson and A. Legege 1993. Early changes in water stable aggregate induced by tillage in a soil under barley production. Canadian Journal of Soil Science. 73: 51 59.

[6] Beare, M.H., Parmelee, R.W and D.A. Crossley 1992. Microbiology and fauna interactions and effects of litter nitrogen and decomposition in agro ecosystems. Ecology Monograph. 62:569 591.

[7] Cever, W. I. 2008. The role of N, P and K in the mineral nutrition of cassava. Crop Physiology. 20: 17 23.

[8] Gliesman, P. I. 2011. Molecular mechanisms of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake in cassava. International Journal of Food Science and Agricultural Research. 31:344 -349.

[9] International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) 1989. Automated and semi automated methods of soil and plant analysis. Manual Series. No 7, IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria.

[10] Powel, A. P. 2011. Mineral sources of potassium for cassava nutrition. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture. 27:512 518.

[11] Raper, S. E. 2009. Effects of nitrogen and potassium application on growth, yield and cyanide content of cassava. Journal of Food and Plant Nutrition. 21(1):34 -41.

[12] Robertson, E. A., A. Atiri, Y. Hill, E. Liang. 2004. Soil and fertilizer use in the tropics. Biology and Fertility of Soils. 18:241 247.

[13] Schim, M. N.2004. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on photophosphorylation in cassava in relation to the photosynthetic rate. Crop Improvement 20:213 219.

[14] Soag, T. 2010. Effects of sodium and potassium on the growth and oxalate content of cassava. Fertilizer and Plant Nutrition Research. 23(1):333 -339.

[15] Soil Survey Staff (SSS) 2003. Keys to soil taxonomy, 9th edition. United States Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Conservation Services, US Department of Agriculture, Washington D. C. 306 pp.

[16] Syris, B. E. 2011. Nitrogen and potassium interrelations in growth and mineral content of cassava. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Studies. 15:1 -6.

[17] Tryon, K. F. 2009. Field trials of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on yield and quality of cassava roots in Eastern Nigeria. Biological and Physical Sciences. 12:70 77.

[18] Weig, S. 2008. Growth and yield of cassava in relation to different sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Basic Sciences. 18(2):321 -328.

[19] Wenaba, V. O. 2008.Enhancing cassava yield through application of organic fertilizers. Journal of Agricultural and Food Sciences. 31:555 562.

[20] Winda, E. O. 2013. Soil organic matter dynamics under cassava based intercropping systems. Soil Science and Land Resources. 43:661 668.

[21] Wooas, E. J. 2013. Soil organic matter dynamics and sustainability of tropical Agriculture. Interrnational Journal of Forestry and Agricultural Sciences. 23(2):45 52..