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IJSTR >> Volume 9 - Issue 1, January 2020 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Lightning Return Stroke Models – A Critical Review Based On Comparison Of Lightning Parameters

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Srisailam Sreedhar, Venkatesh Srinivasan

 

KEYWORDS

Distributed Circuit Models, Electro-Magnetic Models, Engineering Models, Gas Dynamic Models, Lightning Attachment Models, Return stroke, Stepped leader.

 

ABSTRACT

Lightning is an intense bright discharge of the ionized sky or a thin channel of luminous spark directed towards the earth through the air that could present considerable risk to mankind and also possibly cause significant damage to buildings, monuments, transmission lines etc. Hence, it is necessary to provide appropriate protection against such large currents and strong electromagnetic radiation that are created from lightning phenomenon. A domain of considerable significance that continues to present considerable challenges to the scientific fraternity in the field of lightning protection is in understanding the underlying physical development process of lightning and the consequent disaster mechanism. Researchers have carried out diverse experimental analysis to ascertain the role and characteristics of lightning which occurs due to discharge of the large amount of charge accumulated in the cloud. Lightning discharge occurring between the nearest clouds called Cloud-to-Cloud (CC) flash or discharges which travel as a stepped leader which reaches earth forming Cloud-to-Ground (CG) flash are of significant interest. The hazards caused by the lightning are invariably modelled and inferred as a consequence of the resulting return stroke formed during the process of stepped leader descending on to the earth or a grounded system. In this context, several researchers have developed and postulated models by representing properties of lightning return stroke utilizing experimental data such as time-based changes in the base current and its derivatives, return stroke speed and electromagnetic field etc to a substantial degree of success. Though return models based to gas dynamics, electromagnetics, transmission line, hybrid and leader attachment representations has been widely utilized by the scientific community recently, there has been renewed focus in understanding and implementing modelling of lightning return strokes based on hybrid models and representation based on leader attachment methods. This research study focuses on providing a comprehensive overview and detailed comparison of various categories in lightning return stroke models, in addition to appropriate assumptions, merits and limitations to facilitate better understanding on characteristics of lightning phenomenon and provide vital clues into implementation of return stroke modelling.

 

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