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IJSTR >> Volume 8 - Issue 3, March 2019 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Song And Typography: Expressing The Lyrics Visually Through Lyrical Typography

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Agung Zainal Muttakin Raden, Muhammad Iqbal Qeis

 

KEYWORDS

Lyrical typography, illustration, expression, song, visual

 

ABSTRACT

A song is one of the media used to express emotions or convey messages. Aside of music and rhythm, the lyrics also plays an important tole to convey these messages. However, song lyrics are usually written in the form of rigid text with a monotonous form, so that it only served as a pointer without any expression and emotional value. This article will discuss the way the text of the lyrics can help express the emotion and message within the song by using lyrical typography. This article discussed an experimental research method done with the approach of typography, semantics, and illustration to create a visual experience in writing the song lyrics. The result compiles the illustrations from the said experiments and show that lyrical typography can help express the song so that the audience can see the visualization created and gain a new way to experience the song through the use of this lyrical typography.

 

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