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IJSTR >> Volume 9 - Issue 3, March 2020 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



A Review On The Social Life Of Mising Tribe Of Assam

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Jharna Morang

 

KEYWORDS

Ali aye Ligang, do:nyi polo, democracy, Mising tribe, marriage system, , mibu, po:rag.

 

ABSTRACT

North – East India is a land of conglomeration of multiple ethnic groups. Among the eight sisters of north – east , Assam is significant where around seventeen tribes resides. Their tradition , culture, dress, language, food habit and unique way of life enriches Assamese society and culture. Next to Bodo tribe , the Mising formerly referred to as Miri is considered as the second largest ethnic group of Assam. They belong to Indo - Mongoloid group. Basically they are riverine tribe. Their marriage system is typical enough. Generally there are different ways that the Mising get married. The traditional religious beliefs of the Mising are animistic in nature. The people of Misig consider themselves to be the descendent of donyi polo. Significantly all rites are performed by the Mibu. But in due course of time many rites and rituals have already been lost from the society. Ali – Aye- Ligang and Po:rag are the chief traditional festivals observed by the Mising. Notably contribution of Mising tribe towards building a strong democracy is remarkable one. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the socio cultural life of Mising tribe of Assam.

 

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