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IJSTR >> Volume 8 - Issue 10, October 2019 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Studies The Use Of Smartphone Sensor For Physics Learning

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Luh Sukariasih, Erniwati, La Sahara, Luluk Hariroh, Suritno Fayanto

 

KEYWORDS

Sensor, smartphone, learning physics, education, learning process

 

ABSTRACT

The use of cellular technology reshapes the way of teaching and learning. This article reports the use smartphone sensors to perform several experiments designed to teach the fundamentals of Physics. We have adapted traditional physics laboratories with the use of various sensors that can be found on typical smartphones, such as the accelerometer, and light field sensors and magnetic fields and others. This article offers students new ways to think of smartphones as an interesting tool for learning physics for possible applications in experimental and scientific measurements made in the form of demonstrations and not just as a means of socialization. Therefore, with the presence of various smartphone sensors, it can simplify the experiment and make it possible to understand the concepts of physics and what is equally important is reducing costs.

 

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