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IJSTR >> Volume 8 - Issue 11, November 2019 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Identification and Testing Resistance Against Bacteria Isolated Mercury from Gold Mining In Gogorea Buru

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Rosita Mangesa, Kasmawati Kasmawati, Darma Darma, Syafa Lisaholit, Aria Bayu Setiaji, M Chairul Basrun Umanailo

 

KEYWORDS

Identification of Bacteria, Resistance, Mercury, Gogorea, Buru

 

ABSTRACT

Gogorea is one of the villages in the area Buru island that serve as the site of gold. Most of the people of the island rush to mine the use of mercury in the amalgamation process. Mercury is harmful chemicals and cause adverse effects to living beings and the environment, to overcome it can be utilized microbes that are resistant to mercury. The purpose of this study is to obtain a bacteria that is resistance. This research is a qualitative descriptive study. To get the bacteria resistant to mercury initial phase was isolated, then tested the sensitivity of bacteria to mercury, and the next stage of bacterial identification. Based on the results of the samples obtained four isolates Gogorea village, which when tested sensitivity to 10ppm, 20ppm, 30ppm and there is no clear zone so that the four isolates are considered resistant to mercury. Of the four isolates were identified by a type of bacteria the sample G1.1 Chryseobacterium sp. Gogorea is one of the villages in the area Buru island that serve as the site of gold. Most of the people of the island rush to mine the use of mercury in the amalgamation process. Mercury is harmful chemicals and cause adverse effects to living beings and the environment, to overcome it can be utilized microbes that are resistant to mercury. The purpose of this study is to obtain a bacteria that is resistance. This research is a qualitative descriptive study. To get the bacteria resistant to mercury initial phase was isolated, then tested the sensitivity of bacteria to mercury, and the next stage of bacterial identification. Based on the results of the samples obtained four isolates Gogorea village, which when tested sensitivity to 10ppm, 20ppm, 30ppm and there is no clear zone so that the four isolates are considered resistant to mercury. Of the four isolates were identified by a type of bacteria the sample G1.1 Chryseobacterium sp

 

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