IJSTR

International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

IJSTR@Facebook IJSTR@Twitter IJSTR@Linkedin
Home About Us Scope Editorial Board Blog/Latest News Contact Us
Scopus/Elsevier
CALL FOR PAPERS
AUTHORS
DOWNLOADS
CONTACT
QR CODE
IJSTR-QR Code

IJSTR >> Volume 9 - Issue 1, January 2020 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Collective Action: Tackling Corruption In Business Sector

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Zainul Djumadin, Zulkarnain, Yusuf Wibisono

 

KEYWORDS

Corruption, Business Sector, Collective Action.

 

ABSTRACT

This paper tries to disentangle the challenges of implementation of collective action in business sector, the exit strategy to overcome such challenges, as well as the best practice of the implementation of collective action. In principle, corruption in terms of bribery requires a payer and a beneficiary. The former is related to some influential individuals within the private sector, while in the latter constitutes the government apparatus. However, those at private sector might serve as a payer and a payee since this sector grows gradually in developing and emerging economies. By working collectively, civil society can assist companies to create a promising business climate among competitors and can stimulate other individuals and organizations to cirvumvent bribery. In addition, the implementation of collective action in the corruption prone countries and sectors can make business transactions become translucent and foreseeable.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Gray, C. & Kaufmann, D. (1998). Corruption and Development. Retrieved from
https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/1998/03/pdf/gray.pdf (30 August 2019).
[2] Svensson, J. (2003). Who Must Pay Bribes and How Much? Evidence from a Cross Section of Firms. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 118(1), pp. 207-230.
[3] Rose-Ackerman, S. (2007). Measuring Private Sector Corruption. Retrieved from http://www.u4.no/publications/measuring-private- sector-corruption/ (1 September 2019).

[4] Vitell, S.J., & Festervand, T.A. (1987). Business Ethics: Conflicts, Practices and Beliefs of Industrial Executives. Journal of Business Ethics, 6(2), pp. 111-122.
[5] World Bank Institute. (2008). Fighting corruption through collective action—a guide for business. Retrieved from https://www.globalcompact.de/wAssets/docs/Korruptionspraeventi on/Publikationen/fighting_corruption_through_collective_action.pd f (2 September 2019).
[6] Transparency International. (2017). Global Corruption Barometer. Retrieved from
https://www.transparency.org/whatwedo/publication/people_and_c orruption_citizens_voices_from_around_the_world (30 August
2019).
[7] World Bank Institute. (2008). Fighting corruption through collective action—a guide for business. Retrieved from https://www.globalcompact.de/wAssets/docs/Korruptionspraeventi on/Publikationen/fighting_corruption_through_collective_action.pd f (2 September 2019).
[8] Gehlbach, S. (2006). The Consequences of Collective Action: An Incomplete-Contracts Approach. American Journal of Political Science, 50(3), pp. 802-823.
[9] Doner, R., & Schneider, B.R. (2000). Business Associations and Economic Development: Why Some Associations Contribute More Than Others. Business and Politics, 2(3), pp. 261-288.
[10] Brew, P., & Moberg, J. (2006). The power of joining forces—the case for collective action in fighting corruption. In: Errath, B. Business against corruption—case stories and examples. Retrieved from www.unglobalcompact.org/docs/issues_doc/7.7/BACbookFINAL.pd f (1 September 2019).
[11] Ostrom, E. (1990). Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[12] World Bank Institute. (2008). Fighting corruption through collective action—a guide for business. Retrieved from https://www.globalcompact.de/wAssets/docs/Korruptionspraeventi on/Publikationen/fighting_corruption_through_collective_action.pd f (2 September 2019).
[13] Hess, D., & Ford, C.L. (2008). Corporate Corruption and Reform Undertakings: A new approach to an old problem. Cornell International Law Journal, 41(2), pp. 307-346.
[14] Hess, D., & Ford, C.L. (2008). Corporate Corruption and Reform Undertakings: A new approach to an old problem. Cornell International Law Journal, 41(2), pp. 307-346.
[15] Richardson, G.B. (1972). The Organisation of Industry. The Economic Journal, 82(327), pp. 883-896.
[16] Olson, M. (1971). The logic of collective action. Public goods and the theory of groups. London: Harvard University Press.
[17] Olson, M. (1971). The logic of collective action. Public goods and the theory of groups. London: Harvard University Press.
[18] Ostrom, E. (1990). Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[19] Doner, R., & Schneider, B.R. (2000). Business Associations and Economic Development: Why Some Associations Contribute More Than Others. Business and Politics, 2(3), pp. 261-288.
[20] Polenske, K.R. (2004). Competition, Collaboration and Cooperation: An Uneasy Triangle in Networks of Firms and Regions. Regional Studies, 38(9), pp. 1029-1043.
[21] Raiser, M. (2003). Trust in Transition. In: Bönker, F., Müller, K., & Pickel, A., editors. Postcommunist Transformation and the Social Sciences: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches. London: Rowman & Littlefield.
[22] Brew, P., & Moberg, J. (2006). The power of joining forces—the case for collective action in fighting corruption. In: Errath, B., editors. Business against corruption—case stories and examples. Retrieved from www.unglobalcompact.org/docs/issues_doc/7.7/BACbookFINAL.pd f (1 September 2019).
[23] Brew, P., & Moberg, J. (2006). The power of joining forces—the case for collective action in fighting corruption. In: Errath, B., editors. Business against corruption—case stories and examples. Retrieved from